Mamedyarov wins Shamkir 2016

Coming in as the 6th seed in this tournament, Mamedyarov made it through the end, beating Fabiano Caruana and Anish Giri in the last two rounds.

Advertisements

Chessbase:

In an astonishing round that had to have Gashimov smiling, the final round saw three of his compatriots winning their final games. However, the biggest result was of course Mamedyarov who defeated Giri in a superb rook endgame he played to perfection, right after beating Caruana in the previous round. In a nail-biting playoff, he defeated Caruana and snatched the title.

Coming in as the 6th seed in this tournament, Mamedyarov made it through the end, beating Fabiano Caruana and Anish Giri in the last two rounds, and beating Caruana further in the tie-break playoff games.

Final standings before the playoff games follow:

shamkir-2016-final

Continue reading “Mamedyarov wins Shamkir 2016”

Advertisements

June 2016 FIDE Ratings List

Check out the current top 20 in the world in the list that follows.

No doubt, the reigning world champion is still on top with 2855, up 4 points from last month. But Vladimir Kramnik, from last month’s 2801, gained 11 more ELO points to take the second spot from Fabiano Caruana for this month’s official FIDE Ratings List June 2016.

Wesley So, although lost 5 points by virtue of his game 3 loss to Ding Liren, is still at No. 10, but now tied with Vishy Anand.

Here’s the current top 20 in the world:

Rk Name Fed Rtg Gms B-Year
1 Carlsen, Magnus NOR 2855 9 1990
2 Kramnik, Vladimir RUS 2812 14 1975
3 Caruana, Fabiano USA 2804 0 1992
4 Aronian, Levon ARM 2792 9 1982
5 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime FRA 2789 10 1990
6 Nakamura, Hikaru USA 2787 0 1987
7 Ding, Liren CHN 2783 4 1992
8 Giri, Anish NED 2782 9 1994
9 Karjakin, Sergey RUS 2774 3 1990
10 So, Wesley USA 2770 4 1993
11 Anand, Viswanathan IND 2770 0 1969
12 Harikrishna, P. IND 2764 9 1986
13 Topalov, Veselin BUL 2761 9 1975
14 Svidler, Peter RUS 2759 7 1976
15 Li, Chao b CHN 2758 9 1989
16 Eljanov, Pavel UKR 2751 9 1983
17 Grischuk, Alexander RUS 2747 8 1983
18 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar AZE 2746 9 1985
19 Navara, David CZE 2744 11 1985
20 Andreikin, Dmitry RUS 2743 9 1990

Chessbase lists the complete top 100 and discusses about the top climbers and descenders in the list, among others.

The ‘new’ youngest chess International Master (IM)

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM so far at 10 years and 10 months old.

Praggnanandhaa is just 10 years and 10 months old, and he is about to receive his IM title soon, as he recently earned his third and final IM norm in Bhubaneswar in India.

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.
Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.

The New Indian Express writes:

A couple of years on, the kid who slept during a game is one of the biggest stories in world chess. The 10-year-old from Chennai achieved his third and final International Master (IM) norm after beating a Grandmaster and holding two others at the KIIT International Festival of Chess in Bhubaneswar.

When I was 10 years old, I have yet to learn how to play the game of chess.

Thus, R Praggnanandhaa has at most 21 months to finish his GM norms in order to beat the current youngest GM ever, the challenger in this year’s world championship, Sergey Karjakin. We’re eager to watch out for that if he could indeed make it.

For your reference, the following is the list of the youngest GM’s, their age when they achieved them, their birthyears, and the year they achieved their GM title. Check out the list after the jump »

Who will win if Bobby played Karpov in 1975?

Susan Polgar: I think it would have been very close. However, Bobby would have had a small edge due to his greater experience at that time.

Susan Polgar:

I spoke to Boris Spassky about this same issue and he believes that Bobby would have won in 1975, but that Anatoly would have won the rematch.

However, Garry Kasparov has a different viewpoint. He believes that Anatoly would have won in 1975 and supports this opinion by demonstrating the quality of their games at that time. This is what that makes chess so interesting. From all of the people I spoke to, the opinions split right down the middle with a small edge for Bobby.

I think it would have been very close. However, Bobby would have had a small edge due to his greater experience at that time.

Just one of those ‘what-if’ questions that will obviously solicit differing opinions from different people. Apparently, we can’t hold on to the past anymore. Thus, the more relevant question now is: Who will win this year’s world championship?

Levon Aronian on Chess Training

Levon Aronian:

As a rule, a strong chess player never trains with a strong chess player. You discover new steps and develop new strategies during the game, and it’s not desirable that another strong chess player knows about them. That’s why there are special assistants, who, although being good players, are not the strongest.

A great insight into the work put by a grandmaster into his chess. Read more about how he dealt with his defeat in the recent Candidates’ tournament and other issues in this Aronian interview.

Photo courtesy of Champord.

ChessBase and Cloud Engines

Fritz 15 and ChessBase has this feature wherein you can use a cloud engine to analyze chess games from your computer. That way, you’re not confined to the processing power of your modest laptop.

A cloud engine could be that with the humongous processor from a custom rig anywhere in the world, or perhaps even the gaming rig you have at home.

I knew it was just a matter of time before someone do this cloud engine thing. If ChessBase didn’t pioneer it, someone else could beat them to it.

Read more.

Sexism in Chess

Sexism shouldn’t have a place in the world of chess.

Robbie Couch on Upworthy:

Ferrera shared a personal story about a young girl whose telling experience is a tough one to forget:

“I was moderating a conversation once among young women, and there was something that a young girl said that has really stayed with me. She stood up and she asked one of our panelists … ‘I was on the chess team. I was really good. But I was the only girl on the chess team, and it felt hard to be there, so I quit.’ And I haven’t been able to shake that. Because if we can’t get our young girls to stay in the room for the chess team, how are we gonna get them to stay in the room to be leaders in business, leaders in politics, leaders in medicine, leaders in science?”

A sad story, indeed. I know we still have to see a lot more women grandmasters competing at chess’ highest levels (Hou Yifan is currently the highest rated woman chess player at 2663 as of April 2016, and she’s only 85th and the only woman among the world’s top 100), but sexism shouldn’t be a reason why more women shouldn’t get to the top of the chess world.

Touch-Move Rule Adventures — errrr — Misadventures

GM Gregory Serper on Chess.com:

I am probably a lucky guy, because I never had any “touch-move rule” episodes in my whole chess career. Don’t get me wrong, it happened numerous times in my games that either I or my opponent touched a wrong piece at a wrong time, but in all such situations the game continued according to the tournament rules and no complaints were made.

Funny article. I guess the article should have been titled “Touch-Move Rule Misadvantures”.