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The ‘new’ youngest chess International Master (IM)

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM so far at 10 years and 10 months old.

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Praggnanandhaa is just 10 years and 10 months old, and he is about to receive his IM title soon, as he recently earned his third and final IM norm in Bhubaneswar in India.

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.
Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.

The New Indian Express writes:

A couple of years on, the kid who slept during a game is one of the biggest stories in world chess. The 10-year-old from Chennai achieved his third and final International Master (IM) norm after beating a Grandmaster and holding two others at the KIIT International Festival of Chess in Bhubaneswar.

When I was 10 years old, I have yet to learn how to play the game of chess.

Thus, R Praggnanandhaa has at most 21 months to finish his GM norms in order to beat the current youngest GM ever, the challenger in this year’s world championship, Sergey Karjakin. We’re eager to watch out for that if he could indeed make it.

For your reference, the following is the list of the youngest GM’s, their age when they achieved them, their birthyears, and the year they achieved their GM title. Check out the list after the jump »

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May 2016 FIDE Ratings List

The updated ratings for May 2016 are out. Here’s the the top 20:

FIDE-May-2016-Top-20

See how 80% of the Top 10 are 90’s babies, i.e., they were born in the 1990’s. It speaks volumes about the quality of computer support these kids got especially when they were starting out.

Anyway, Wesley So retains his hold onto the 10th place, ahead of two former world champions Viswanathan Anand and Veselin Topalov.

The World Championship we are about to witness in November is between the No. 1 player Magnus Carlsen and No. 8 Sergey Karjakin. Looks like a heavily lopsided match to me, I dare say.

Check out the top 100 players here.

Carlsen wins Norway Chess 2016

Chessbase:

After seven rounds Magnus Carlsen looked almost certain to win the Altibox Norway Chess tournament. But then he lost against Levon Aronian in round eight, endangering his tournament win. But things went his way in round nine. Aronian drew against Pentala Harikrishna while Carlsen defeated Pavel Eljanov to win Norway Chess for the first time.

A true champion knows how to pick himself up after a fall–even from the penultimate round.

Carlsen is still the man to beat in Norway Chess 2016 after 5 Rounds

Magnus Carlsen draws with Anish Giri in the 5th round but still retain the lead thereafter. Crosstable after 5 rounds follow:

4th Norway Chess 2016 after Round 5
4th Norway Chess 2016 after Round 5

You may replay the game: Magnus Carlsen vs. Anish Giri, Round 5 – Norway Chess 2016.

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