The ‘new’ youngest chess International Master (IM)

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM so far at 10 years and 10 months old.

Praggnanandhaa is just 10 years and 10 months old, and he is about to receive his IM title soon, as he recently earned his third and final IM norm in Bhubaneswar in India.

Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.
Praggnanandhaa is the youngest chess IM in history.

The New Indian Express writes:

A couple of years on, the kid who slept during a game is one of the biggest stories in world chess. The 10-year-old from Chennai achieved his third and final International Master (IM) norm after beating a Grandmaster and holding two others at the KIIT International Festival of Chess in Bhubaneswar.

When I was 10 years old, I have yet to learn how to play the game of chess.

Thus, R Praggnanandhaa has at most 21 months to finish his GM norms in order to beat the current youngest GM ever, the challenger in this year’s world championship, Sergey Karjakin. We’re eager to watch out for that if he could indeed make it.

For your reference, the following is the list of the youngest GM’s, their age when they achieved them, their birthyears, and the year they achieved their GM title. Check out the list after the jump »

Who will win if Bobby played Karpov in 1975?

Susan Polgar: I think it would have been very close. However, Bobby would have had a small edge due to his greater experience at that time.

Susan Polgar:

I spoke to Boris Spassky about this same issue and he believes that Bobby would have won in 1975, but that Anatoly would have won the rematch.

However, Garry Kasparov has a different viewpoint. He believes that Anatoly would have won in 1975 and supports this opinion by demonstrating the quality of their games at that time. This is what that makes chess so interesting. From all of the people I spoke to, the opinions split right down the middle with a small edge for Bobby.

I think it would have been very close. However, Bobby would have had a small edge due to his greater experience at that time.

Just one of those ‘what-if’ questions that will obviously solicit differing opinions from different people. Apparently, we can’t hold on to the past anymore. Thus, the more relevant question now is: Who will win this year’s world championship?

Levon Aronian on Chess Training

Levon Aronian:

As a rule, a strong chess player never trains with a strong chess player. You discover new steps and develop new strategies during the game, and it’s not desirable that another strong chess player knows about them. That’s why there are special assistants, who, although being good players, are not the strongest.

A great insight into the work put by a grandmaster into his chess. Read more about how he dealt with his defeat in the recent Candidates’ tournament and other issues in this Aronian interview.

Photo courtesy of Champord.

ChessBase and Cloud Engines

Fritz 15 and ChessBase has this feature wherein you can use a cloud engine to analyze chess games from your computer. That way, you’re not confined to the processing power of your modest laptop.

A cloud engine could be that with the humongous processor from a custom rig anywhere in the world, or perhaps even the gaming rig you have at home.

I knew it was just a matter of time before someone do this cloud engine thing. If ChessBase didn’t pioneer it, someone else could beat them to it.

Read more.

Sexism in Chess

Sexism shouldn’t have a place in the world of chess.

Robbie Couch on Upworthy:

Ferrera shared a personal story about a young girl whose telling experience is a tough one to forget:

“I was moderating a conversation once among young women, and there was something that a young girl said that has really stayed with me. She stood up and she asked one of our panelists … ‘I was on the chess team. I was really good. But I was the only girl on the chess team, and it felt hard to be there, so I quit.’ And I haven’t been able to shake that. Because if we can’t get our young girls to stay in the room for the chess team, how are we gonna get them to stay in the room to be leaders in business, leaders in politics, leaders in medicine, leaders in science?”

A sad story, indeed. I know we still have to see a lot more women grandmasters competing at chess’ highest levels (Hou Yifan is currently the highest rated woman chess player at 2663 as of April 2016, and she’s only 85th and the only woman among the world’s top 100), but sexism shouldn’t be a reason why more women shouldn’t get to the top of the chess world.

Touch-Move Rule Adventures — errrr — Misadventures

GM Gregory Serper on Chess.com:

I am probably a lucky guy, because I never had any “touch-move rule” episodes in my whole chess career. Don’t get me wrong, it happened numerous times in my games that either I or my opponent touched a wrong piece at a wrong time, but in all such situations the game continued according to the tournament rules and no complaints were made.

Funny article. I guess the article should have been titled “Touch-Move Rule Misadvantures”.

Wesley So vs. Garry Kasparov Round 10 Video Coverage

Remember that super game by GM Wesley So? This is how it unfolded.

Watch how the Round 10 unfolded between Wesley So and Garry Kasparov of the US Ultimate Blitz Challenge 2016. After Wesley So smothered him in this blitz game, perhaps out of frustration or embarrassment (who knows?) — Garry Kasparov walked out immediately of the playing hall. Check out also how the commentators described how astonishing Wesley was playing in this game.

Continue reading “Wesley So vs. Garry Kasparov Round 10 Video Coverage”

Ding Liren Inches Up Two Spots in the Live Ratings

Wesley So lost 5 ELO points, while Ding Liren gained 5 to move past Anish Giri and Sergey Karjakin.

After defeating Wesley So in the 2016 China-USA Chess Grandmaster Summit, Chinese GM Ding Liren advanced to spots in the Live Ratings as of today, May 12th, 2016.

live-rating-2016-05-11

Apparently, that event was rated. Continue reading “Ding Liren Inches Up Two Spots in the Live Ratings”

Final Result: The 2016 China-USA Chess Grandmaster Summit

Ding Liren indeed drew blood in the 3rd game. He wins the match at 2.5-1.5. Replay all the 4 games below.

It can be recalled that the first two games ended in draws.

In the third match, someone indeed drew blood.

Playing as white, GM Ding Liren of China defeated GM Wesley So of USA in a Queen’s Gambit Declined in Game 3 of the 2016 China-USA Chess Grandmaster Summit.

The match continued with the final game — Game 4 — which ended in the third draw.

Thus, the match stood at 2.5-1.5 in favor of the Chinese Ding Liren.

You may replay the all the four games below: Continue reading “Final Result: The 2016 China-USA Chess Grandmaster Summit”